About Us

CHANCE is copublished quarterly by the American Statistical Association and Taylor & Francis Group. The magazine is designed for anyone who has an interest in the analysis of data, informally highlighting sound statistical practice. CHANCE is not a technical magazine, but rather a cultural record of an evolving field, intended to entertain as well as inform.

Since its creation in 1988, CHANCE has covered such topics as the 1990 census adjustment and the redesigned population survey, sports, the environment, DNA evidence in the courts, a variety of medical issues—even how to win on “Jeopardy.” CHANCE offers a unique opportunity to reach beyond statistics professionals to a more general audience.

Executive Editor

EvansScott Evans is a senior research scientist at Harvard University, where he is the director of the Statistical and Data Management Center for the Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group and teaches clinical trials. He’s received the Robert Zackin Distinguished Collaborative Statistician Award for significant statistical contributions to HIV research and a recognition award from the Harvard School of Public Health IRB. He is also a Fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA). Evans is a member of an FDA advisory committee and has served on and chaired numerous data monitoring committees and scientific advisory committees. He is the past president of the ASA Boston Chapter, past chair of the ASA Development Committee, past chair of the ASA Teaching Statistics in the Health Sciences and Statistics in Sports sections, and member of the board of directors for Mu Sigma Rho, the National Honorary Society for Statistics.

Advisory Editors

BehsetaSam Behseta earned his PhD from Carnegie Mellon University and is a professor at California State University, Fullerton. His main research area is statistics in neuroscience. Other research interests include stochastic modeling of decisionmaking with multi-alternatives, Bayesian functional data analysis, Bayesian nonparametrics, statistical modeling of epidemiological data, and probabilistic watermarking. Behseta has trained and mentored undergraduate and graduate students.

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larsenMichael Larsen earned his PhD in statistics from Harvard University and is associate professor of statistics at George Washington University in Washington, DC. He has been on the faculty at Iowa State University and The University of Chicago and worked as a consultant with the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, NORC, and the Gallup Organization, Inc. His research interests include survey sampling, missing data, record linkage, statistical modeling, applied statistics, and statistics education.

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stanglDalene Stangl is professor of the practice of statistics and public policy and associate chair of the Department of Statistical Science at Duke University in North Carolina. She is reviews editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association and The American Statistician and has co-authored more than 100 articles in statistics, as well as contributed substantive research to journals in medicine and health policy. Her professional interests are hierarchical models, meta-analysis, decision analysis, and the reform of statistical education and statistical practice.

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lavine

Michael Lavine was a professor of statistics at Duke University from 1987 through 2008 and is now professor of statistics and director of the Statistical Consulting and Collaboration Center at UMass Amherst. He is author of the free graduate-level text Introduction to Statistical Thought. He has wide interests in statistical methodology and applications and is Subject Matter Editor for statistical articles in Ecology and Ecological Monographs.

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sternHal S. Stern is Ted and Janice Smith Family Foundation Dean of the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences and professor of statistics at the University of California, Irvine. Prior to becoming dean, he was founding chair of the department of statistics at UC Irvine and held faculty positions at Iowa State University and Harvard University. His research interests include assessing the fit of statistical models, combining information using Bayesian methods, applications of statistics in the social and biological sciences, and statistics in sports. He has authored more than 80 refereed journal publications and is co-author of the graduate-level statistics text Bayesian Data Analysis. He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and Institute of Mathematical Statistics.

Editors

ChenouriShojaeddin Chenouri earned his PhD from the University of Waterloo and is an associate professor and director of the statistical consulting center in the department of statistics and actuarial science at the University of Waterloo. He serves as an associate editor of the Journal of Statistical Computation and Simulation. His research interests include data depth and it applications, high-dimensional data analysis, dimensionality reduction, statistics in neuroscience, social and epidemic networks, statistical process control, environmental and water quality research, and transportation research.

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dunnMichelle Dunn is a program director for statistical methodology grants at the National Cancer Institute. She did her undergraduate studies in applied mathematics at Harvard and earned her PhD in statistics from Carnegie Mellon University, working with Jay Kadane on the detection of anomalies in web traffic. If she had free time, Dunn would enjoy cooking, sailing, and traveling around the world.

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eversonPhil Everson is a professor of statistics at Swarthmore College. He earned his BA from Pomona College and his master’s and PhD from the department of statistics at Harvard University.

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hardinJo Hardin is an associate professor at Pomona College in Claremont, California. Her research interests include outlier detection, clustering, and robust methods, particularly applied to large data sets. Recently, she has worked on microarray data, creating similarity measures for determining coexpression of genes. Outside of work, she enjoys reading, running, and breeding tortoises.

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hortonNicholas Horton is a professor of statistics at Amherst College in Massachusetts. His research interests are in longitudinal regression models and missing data methods, with applications in psychiatric epidemiology and substance abuse research.

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LaneTom Lane earned his PhD at MIT and is a statistician at MathWorks, where he manages development for the MATLAB Statistics Toolbox. He formerly developed statistical software while at Domain Manufacturing Corporation, BBN, and IBM Research.

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meyerMary Meyer is originally from Chicago and earned her PhD from the University of Michigan. She is currently associate professor of statistics at Colorado State University at Fort Collins. Her research interests are in nonparametric function estimation and inference methods using shape restrictions.

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mcdermottMichael McDermott is a professor of biostatistics and neurology and a professor in the Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. He is also associate chair of the department of biostatistics and computational biology and director of graduate studies for the department. He has been a leading member of several national and international collaborative groups conducting clinical research in neurological disease, neuro-ophthalmological disorders, and pain. He is a former associate editor of the journal Neurology and is on the editorial board of the journal Movement Disorders. His research interests include order-restricted inference, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and surfaces, missing data problems, meta-analysis, and clinical trials methodology.

myersKary Myers earned her degrees from Carnegie Mellon University while working on projects ranging from galaxy clusters to speech recognition to neuroimaging. As a scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, she applies statistical and machine learning techniques to time series data in the context of remote sensing (not to be confused with remote viewing).

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Shane ReeseShane Reese is a professor and associate chair at Brigham Young University in the department of statistics. His research interests include reliability analysis and applications of Bayesian methods to problems in sports, national security, climate, and physical systems. He has served as an ASA chapter president twice and on several ASA committees and two National Academy of Sciences committees. Besides having a passion for the role of statistics in scientific discovery, he also enjoys playing most sports and coaching his kids in sports.

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Babak Shahbaba is assistant professor of biostatistics at the University of California, Irvine, where he has been teaching undergraduate courses such as Introduction to Biostatistics and graduate courses such as Advanced Statistical Methods and Bayesian Analysis. His research interest is related to developing novel statistical methods to answer research questions in genomics, proteomics, and cancer studies.

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TianLu Tian holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Nankai University, master’s degree in applied mathematics from Nankai University, and doctor of science degree in biostatistics from Harvard University. His graduate study was supported by a Howard Hughes Fellowship and he was awarded the Robert B. Reed Award for Excellence in Biostatistics at Harvard University. He is associate professor in the department of health research and policy at Stanford University. Tian has rich experience in conducting statistical methodological research, planning large epidemiological studies, running data management for randomized clinical trials, and conducting applied data analysis. His current research interest is in developing statistical methods in semiparametric regression modeling, survival analysis, and high-throughput data analysis.

Column Editors

dicook-2014Dianne Cook who writes the Visiphilia column, is a professor of statistics at Iowa State University and an ASA Fellow. Her primary research interest is on visualizing data using interactive graphics. She earned her PhD from Rutgers University in 1993, while working closely with researchers at Bellcore, on grand tour and projection pursuit methods, implemented in the software XGobi. At ISU, she teaches data mining, multivariate analysis, data technologies, and introductory statistics, and she works with graduate students in the Human Computer Interaction program and bioinformatics and computational biology programs.

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  • gelmanAndrew Gelman, is a professor of statistics and political science and director of the Applied Statistics Center at Columbia University. He has received many awards, including the Outstanding Statistical Application Award from the American Statistical Association and the award for best article published in the American Political Science Review. He has coauthored many books; his most recent is Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State: Why Americans Vote the Way They Do.

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    glickmanMark E. Glickman, who writes Here’s to Your Health, is associate professor in the Health Policy and Management Department at the Boston University School of Public Health. He is also senior statistician at the Center for Health Quality, Outcomes and Economics Research, a Veterans Administration Center of Excellence. Much of Glickman’s work is collaborative with health services researchers on a variety of public health topics.

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    jensenShane T. Jensen, who writes A Statistician Reads the Sports Pages, is an associate professor of statistics in the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, where he has been teaching since completing his PhD at Harvard University in 2004. Jensen has published more than 40 academic papers in statistical methodology for a variety of applied areas, including molecular biology, psychology, and sports. He maintains an active research program in developing sophisticated statistical models for the evaluation of player performance in baseball and hockey.

    LazarNicole Lazar, who writes The Big Picture column, earned her PhD from The University of Chicago. She is a professor in the department of statistics at the University of Georgia, and her research interests include the statistical analysis of neuroimaging data, empirical likelihood and other likelihood methods, and data visualization. She also is an associate editor of The American Statistician and The Annals of Applied Statistics and the author of The Statistical Analysis of Functional MRI Data.

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    Christian RobertChristian Robert is a professor of statistics at Université Paris-Dauphine and a senior member of the Institut Universitaire de France. He has authored eight books and more than 150 papers on applied probability, Bayesian statistics, and simulation methods. Robert also served as joint editor of the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B and associate editor for most major statistical journals. He is a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and the recipient of an IMS Medallion.

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    slavkovicAleksandra Slavkovic, who writes O Privacy, Where Art Thou?, earned her PhD from Carnegie Mellon University. She is an associate professor of statistics, with appointments in the department of statistics and Institute for CyberScience at Penn State University and department of public health sciences at Penn State College of Medicine. She serves as an associate editor of the Annals of Applied Statistics, Journal of Privacy and Confidentiality, and Journal of Statistical Computation and Simulation. Her primary research interest is in data privacy and confidentiality. Other research interests include evaluation methods for human performance in virtual environments, statistical data mining, application of statistics to social sciences, algebraic statistics, and causal inference.

    Dalene Stangl is professor of the practice of statistical science and public policy and associate chair of the department of statistical science at Duke University in North Carolina. She has served in editorial positions for the Journal of the American Statistical Association, The American Statistician, and Bayesian Analysis and has co-edited two books with Donald Berry, Bayesian Biostatistics and Meta-Analysis in Medicine and Health Policy. Her primary interest is promoting Bayesian ideas in the reform of statistics education and statistical practice.

    Kari Lock Morgan earned her PhD in statistics from Harvard University and is an assistant professor of the practice in the department of statistical science at Duke University. Her primary interests are causal inference and statistics education.  She is coauthor of the book Statistics: Unlocking the Power of Data.

    Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel is an assistant professor of the practice at Duke University. Her research interests include statistics pedagogy, spatial statistics, small-area estimation, and  survey and public health data. She is a co-author of OpenIntro Statistics and a contributing member of the OpenIntro project, whose mission is to make educational products that are open-licensed, transparent, and help lower barriers to education.

    wainerHoward Wainer, who writes Visual Revelations, is currently distinguished research scientist at the National Board of Medical Examiners and professor of statistics at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He has won numerous awards and is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Educational Research Association. His interests include the use of graphical methods for data analysis and communication, robust statistical methodology, and the development and application of generalizations of item response theory. He has published many books; his latest is The Second Watch: Navigating an Uncertain World.